Accession Number:

AD1048744

Title:

The Genomic Epigenomic, and Quality-of-Life Charteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,30 Sep 2016,29 Sep 2017

Corporate Author:

Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States

Report Date:

2017-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

8.0

Abstract:

Ovarian cancer OC remains a major health problem in the United Sates US. In 2012, there will be an estimated 22,280 cases of epithelial OC EOC resulting in 15,500 deaths. While the median survival of OC patients has improved over the last two decades, the vast majority of patients suffer relapse and develop chemo-resistant disease. The overall survival of patients suffering from OC has not changed appreciably over the last three decades. Despite these dismal statistics, there is a minority of OC patients who are long-term LT survivors 10 years. This includes a subset of advanced stage 15 and a higher proportion of early-stage disease 75. Unfortunately, there is little genomic or biologic characterization of these tumors, or patient reported outcomes that characterize LT survivors. The clinical importance of identifying subsets of patients who may or may not benefit from therapy, and understanding the biology of their tumors, is significant both from a patient survival and quality of life QOL standpoint. The characterization of LT survivors of advanced stage OC will potentially identify molecular and clinical pathways that can be targeted to help women who have shorter survivals. Further, careful characterization of these patients, including their initial and longitudinal health-related QOL reports, their response to treatments, and their tumors will provide significant measures of prognostic factors. Accurate identification of women with high-grade, early stage OC who will recur will allow for tailoring therapy to only those who will benefit. Thus, the systematic molecular and patient-reported outcomes evaluation of LT survivors of OC both early and advanced stage will yield data, which can significantly impact the management of OC patients.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE