Accession Number:

AD1042844

Title:

Stabilization and Reconstruction: A Long Beginning

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article

Corporate Author:

SENATE (UNITED STATES) WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2009-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

International crises are inevitable, and in most cases, U.S. national security interests will be threatened by sustained instability. The war on terror necessitates that we not leave nations crumbling and ungoverned. We have seen how terrorists can exploit nations afflicted by lawlessness and desperate circumstances. They seek out such places to establish training camps, recruit new members, and tap into the global black market in weapons. In this atmosphere, the United States must have the right structures, personnel, and resources in place when an emergency occurs. A delay in response of a few weeks, or even days, can mean the difference between success and failure. Clearly, we need a full range of tools to prevail. My own focus has been on boosting the civilian side of our stabilization and reconstruction capabilities, while encouraging improved mechanisms for civilian and military agencies to work together on these missions. Lessons taken from civil-military interaction in contingencies both large and small, such as Afghanistan or Liberia, should be studied and valuable tools incorporated in our government institutions and response capacity.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Administration and Management
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE