Accession Number:

AD1042636

Title:

Understanding the Impact of Having a Military Father with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) on Adolescent Children

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,25 Sep 2016,24 Sep 2017

Corporate Author:

LONDON UNIV (UNITED KINGDOM) LONDON United Kingdom

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2017-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

17.0

Abstract:

The primary objective of the study is to understand the impact of having a military father on adolescent children. We will examine the influence of paternal PTSD on adolescent childrens emotional wellbeing and behavior and investigate whether adolescents whose fathers have PTSD experience a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, as measured by the Development and Well-Being Assessment DAWBA, compared to those whose fathers do not have PTSD. We will also examine the influence paternal PTSD has on parentchild communication, family dynamics and functioning. In families where the father has PTSD, we will look at the quality of the relationship as measured by the Five Minute Speech Sample and Hot Topics paradigms and check for impaired family dynamics and functioning as measured by the Family Assessment Device FAD compared to families where the father does not have PTSD. Initial analyses have shown a moderately high level of adolescent mental health problems approximately 30,30 of families with poor functioning and 11 of fathers with high levels of expressed emotion. Secondary aims are 1 examine the effect of specific symptoms of PTSD avoidance, angerhostilityemotional numbing on adolescent emotional wellbeing2 develop digital techniques to identify emotional wellbeing in audio-visual data. We believe that adolescents of fathers with prominent angerhostility symptoms will experience a higher prevalence of oppositional deficientconduct disorder as measured by the DAWBA compared to those whose fathers do not have these PTSD symptoms adolescents of fathers with prominent avoidancenumbing symptoms will experience a higher prevalence of depressive disorders as measured by the DAWBA compared those whose fathers do not have these PTSD symptoms. Further, we believe it is possible to identify emotional wellbeing identifiers in the audio-visual data collected during the study.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE