Accession Number:

AD1042277

Title:

Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving (Open Source)

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article

Corporate Author:

MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK COLLEGE PARK United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2016-05-18

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state NESS characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters---also known as a stochastic pump SP---reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same time-averaged values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

Subject Categories:

  • Thermodynamics
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics and Spectroscopy
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Operations Research
  • Physical Chemistry

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE