Accession Number:

AD1042182

Title:

Modelling Risk to US Military Populations from Stopping Blanket Mandatory Polio Vaccination (Open Access Publisher's Version)

Descriptive Note:

Journal Article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA SAN DIEGO United States

Report Date:

2017-09-14

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

Objectives. Transmission of polio poses a threat to military forces when deploying to regions where such viruses are endemic. US born soldiers generally enter service with immunity resulting from childhood immunization against polio moreover, new recruits are routinely vaccinated with inactivated poliovirus vaccine IPV, supplemented based upon deployment circumstances. Given residual protection from childhood vaccination, risk-based vaccination may sufficiently protect troops from polio transmission. Methods. This analysis employed a mathematical system for polio transmission within military populations interacting with locals in a polio-endemic region to evaluate changes in vaccination policy. Results. Removal of blanket immunization had no effect on simulated polio incidence among deployed military populations when risk-based immunization was employed however, when these individuals reintegrated with their base populations, risk of transmission to nondeployed personnel increased by 19 . In the absence of both blanket- and risk-based immunization, transmission to nondeployed populations increased by 25 . The overall number of new infections among nondeployed populations was negligible for both scenarios due to high childhood immunization rates, partial protection against transmission conferred by IPV, and low global disease incidence levels. Conclusion. Risk-based immunization driven by deployment to polio-endemic regions is sufficient to prevent transmission among both deployed and nondeployed US military populations.

Subject Categories:

  • Pharmacology
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE