Accession Number:

AD1040763

Title:

U.S. Air Forces Aerial Spray Mission: Should the Department of Defense Continue to Operate this Weapon of Mass Dispersion

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report

Corporate Author:

AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLL MAXWELL AFB AL MAXWELL AFB United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2015-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

41.0

Abstract:

The Air Force currently operates three C-130 special missions. One of its special missions the aerial spray mission operated by the 910th Airlift Wing at the Youngstown Air Reserve Station in Ohio is the subject of this research. The research question is whether the Department of Defense should continue to operate this specialized operation, or should it be outsourced to commercial sources. This research investigates the many advantages and disadvantages of the military aerial spray program and compare the results to the benefits and hindrances of two private aerial spray companies. Another criteria used is an overall cost assessment to compare the sole military source to both civilian companies, and determine which organization is the most cost effective. The scenario to evaluate the cost criteria was a standard aerial spray mission performed at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota. Both sources possess their own significant advantages and disadvantages to conduct aerial spray operations. It was determined that private aerial applicators can provide aerial dispersion services at a more economical price than the military source. The analysis found that, although military aerial spray is more expensive than contracted aerial spray, a military aerial spray capability should still be retained to conduct spray operations in a deployed environment and for emergency response following national disasters.

Subject Categories:

  • Agricultural Chemistry
  • Transport Aircraft

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE