Accession Number:

AD1040549

Title:

Annual Surveillance Summary: Clostridium difficile Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,01 Jan 2016,31 Dec 2016

Corporate Author:

NAVY AND MARINE CORPS PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER PORTSMOUTH VA PORTSMOUTH United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2017-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

The EpiData Center Department EDC conducts routine surveillance of Clostridium difficile CD incidence among all beneficiaries seeking care within the Military Health System MHS. This report is a calendar year CY 2016 update to the CY 2015 annual report on C. difficile infection CDI among MHS beneficiaries. Multiple data sources were linked to assess descriptive and clinical factors related to CD. Health Level 7 HL7-formatted microbiology and chemistry data identified CDI. These infections were matched to HL7-formatted pharmacy data to assess prescription practices and the Standard Inpatient Data Record SIDR to determine healthcare-associated exposures. CDI incidence in the MHS population in both CY 2016 and CY 2015 showed normal variation when compared to the average annual incidence for CYs 2013-2015 and 2012-2014, respectively. Demographic and clinical characteristics in CY 2016 were similar to trends reported in CY 2015. The burden of CDI continues to largely manifest in the community setting, among beneficiaries aged 45 years and older, and in patients with previous antibiotic and gastric-acid suppressant use. Patients with CDI and specific comorbidities, such as diabetes, renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD, and cancers, represent a patient group within the MHS population that is especially vulnerable to worse health outcomes, such as recurrent CDI and increased risk of mortality. This group may especially benefit from prompt CDI identification and treatment. Interventions that reduce antibiotic exposure are the primary measures recommended to reduce CDI incidence and recurrence. These measures include limiting the use of unnecessary antibiotics, prescribing antibiotics that are lower risk for contributing to CDI, and using antibiotics for the shortest reasonable duration.

Subject Categories:

  • Microbiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE