Accession Number:

AD1040044

Title:

Comparative Assessment of Torso and Seat Mounted Restraint Systems using Manikins on the Vertical Deceleration Tower

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,01 Jul 2014,01 May 2015

Corporate Author:

AIR FORCE RESEARCH LAB WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH HUMAN PERFORMANCE WING (711TH) WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB United States

Report Date:

2017-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

196.0

Abstract:

An experimental effort involving a series of z-axis impact tests was conducted on the 711th Human Performance Wings Vertical Deceleration Tower VDT. The purpose of the tests was to perform a comparative assessment of seat and torso mounted restraint systems during the simulated catapult phase. Parametric assessment was also conducted with other parameters including catapult acceleration, headrest position relative to seatback tangent plane, and head supported mass helmet system. Overall, the series of comparative assessments indicated that a forward headrest of 2.5 in. relative to the seat back and a heavy helmet of 5 lb with a forward cg shift generate greater biodynamic responses during the catapult phase of ejection for both the LOIS and the LARD manikin . The comparative assessment with the SCH indicated that it provided equivalent control of head and torso motion for each manikin relative to the torso harness except for allowing larger shoulder loads for LARD at the 15 G impact level. Risk of neck injury as determined by the AFRL Neck Injury Criteria primarily MANICxz or Nij for those comparative assessments were below establish AFRL risk of injury values. The Nij compressionflexion values were the most critical in all cases. Comparing a baseline ejection seat configuration combined baseline test parameters and a JSF-styled ejection seat configuration combined non-baseline test parameters produced similar biodynamic response parameters for the LOIS and the LARD, but the JSF-styled seat generated a greater risk of neck injury to the occupant at all impact levels. Maximum lumbar loads produced by LARD at 15 G for the harness configuration comparison and the seat configuration comparison were greater for the SCH and the JSF-styled seat, but still below accepted AFRL lumbar load limits. All the data sets collected for this effort will be used in a future human impact study with similar comparative assessments for prediction of biodynamic response.

Subject Categories:

  • Stress Physiology
  • Escape, Rescue and Survival
  • Military Aircraft Operations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE