Accession Number:

AD1022076

Title:

A Nation Struggling To Identify Itself Cote d'Ivoire As A Neopatrimonial State

Descriptive Note:

Technical Report,01 Apr 2011,01 Apr 2011

Corporate Author:

AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE, AIR UNIVERSITY MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE United States

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

25.0

Abstract:

As Africa moved out from the shadows of colonial rule, the continent suffered from numerous conflicts to varying degrees as it struggled to define and govern itself. Over the years many theories and models have emerged to analyze the different reasons for the types of conflicts occurring. One of these frameworks is that of a neopatrimonial system of governance. In and of itself neopatrimonial governance does not cause conflict but as it starts to breakdown and deteriorate, as these systems are prone to do because of their high degree of marginalization, then the likelihood of conflict increases. This is pointed out by Paul Williams when he states, The risks were especially acute when neopatrimonial systems experienced a crisis which the ruling authorities were unable to contain. Such crises tended to occur when external resources financial or political dried up, when outrageous behavior tested the limits of the systems legitimacy, or when other factors developed that made armed rebellion feasible for marginalized segments of the population.1 This paper will show how the conflict in Cote dIvoire ignited in 2002 as a result of the breakdown of the neopatrimonial state.

Subject Categories:

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE