Accession Number:

AD0912772

Title:

Small Force - Big Impact, the Strategic Value of World War 2 Raiding Forces

Descriptive Note:

Research paper

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1972-03-06

Pagination or Media Count:

47.0

Abstract:

Some of the greatest successes in warfare have come with relatively little bloodshed. Raids have been used for centuries. Their strategic purpose is to force a foe to draw his own strength to protect his threatened rear. Strategy in its highest form is the art of achieving ones goal with the smallest expenditure of blood and treasure. Time and surprise are the two most vital elements in war. Surprise is seldom achieved by the orthodox. The most economic dislocation of an enemy come when a small force causes him to divert large portions of his force to unprofitable ends. The new mobility of World War II raiding forces presented opportunities never before known in warfare. The first raids studied are British Commando raids along Europes northwest coast. Next studied in order are the desert raids against the Italians and Germans, and Raids of the French Coast. Both the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor and Doolittles Tokyo raid fit the definition and are studied. The spectacular German Special Troop Operations of Mussolinis Rescue, destruction of the Bridges of Nymegen, Budapest, and the infiltration of a few Germans in US uniforms are examined last. After studying this selected array the strategic value of World War II raiding is drawn together with a glance toward the role of raiding today.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE