Accession Number:

AD0839533

Title:

THE EXCRETION OF URINE COMPONENTS DURING FEVER ATTACKS

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

ARMY BIOLOGICAL LABS FREDERICK MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1965-01-22

Pagination or Media Count:

41.0

Abstract:

The first rise in temperature results in an increase in chlorine, in a decrease of nitrogen or in an increase, and in a diminishing of phosphorus. When the fever persists unchanged, the second period exhibits a gradual decrease in chlorine elimination, an increase in nitrogen or nitrogen stays at the previous height, a decrease in phosphorus. The third period -- still at the same temperature -- exhibits a decrease in chlorine, and an increase in phosphorus and nitrogen to be sure, chlorine has dropped below normal, and phosphorus and nitrogen have risen above normal. At this point, we have the type of elimination which is known as fever urine. This situation may last when the body temperature remains unchanged. When the body temperature drops perhaps due to dilution of the blood, the fourth stage sets in chlorine is retained still more, phosphorus and nitrogen are eliminated still more strongly. When the drop in temperature lasts, chlorine attains its minimum, phosphorus and nitrogen attain their maximum, and the situation changes gradually. The fifth stage begins, the chlorine elimination rises up to normal, P and N recede to normal.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE