Accession Number:

AD0827102

Title:

PATHOGENESIS OF PLAGUE: I. CHANGES IN BLOOD COAGULATION DURING PNEUMONIC PLAGUE IN MONKEYS,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

FORT DETRICK FREDERICK MD

Report Date:

1967-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

A study of blood coagulation in rhesus monkeys with pneumonic plague led to the conclusion that the hemorrhagic tendency in this infection is caused by intravascular coagulation, with depletion of clotting factors. Thrombocytopenia develops 24 to 48 hours before death. Clotting and prothrombin times are significantly prolonged 48 to 96 hours after exposure. The partial thromboplastic time appears to be a more sensitive indicator of the process, becoming distinctly prolonged within 24 to 72 hours after exposure. Fibrinogen levels begin to rise between 24 and 96 hours after exposure to peak values 24 to 48 hours before death. The increase in fibrinogen appears to contradict the theory of intravascular coagulation, but tests for fibrinogen degradation products that might have contributed to the high values were not performed. Furthermore, normal values of fibrinogen have been reported in complex cases of intravascular coagulation, compared with artificial models of the process. Tests for circulating fibrinolysin and anticoagulants were negative. Failure of production of clotting factors by the liver appears unlikely in view of minimal functional and morphological abnormalities of the organ. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Microbiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE