Accession Number:

AD0783199

Title:

The Operational Consequences of Sleep Deprivation and Sleep Deficit

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

ADVISORY GROUP FOR AEROSPACE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE (FRANCE)

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1974-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

51.0

Abstract:

Effects of total sleep loss, partial sleep loss, and sleep stage deprivation are reviewed with particular attention to performance decrement and operational consequences. Physiological changes are minimal during moderate sleep loss, but mood changes are clearly noticeable. The most likely sleep problems for aircrew members are those associated with disruption of sleep- wakefulness cycles and partial sleep loss. Consistent performance decrement is difficult to find, but marked increase in fatigue is a common problem. Sleep loss, both total and partial, tends to potentiate the circadian influence on performance and interact with other stressors to enhance the stress-induced physiological responses. Deprivation of sleep stage REM or sleep stage 4 produces no behavioral changes supportive of earlier beliefs that these two stages, especially stage REM, were necessary for effective waking behavior.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE