Accession Number:

AD0747637

Title:

The Role of Microorganisms in Marine Fouling.

Descriptive Note:

Interim technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

HARVARD UNIV CAMBRIDGE MASS LAB OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1972-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

27.0

Abstract:

A complex community of bacteria, diatoms, protozoa and microalgae is considered collectively as the primary film which develop on non-toxic surfaces immersed in seawater. There appears to be a strong correlation between primary film formation and attachment of animals. Studies conducted in the laboratory on the attachment of oyster larvae Crassostrea virginica to surfaces with a film indicate that differences in the microbiological film are detectable by the larvae. Oyster larvae were observed to display three characteristic chemotactic patterns toward a variety of organic compounds and microorganisms. Studies conducted in the field suggest that the number of animals which attach to a surface is proportional to the number of bacteria composing the primary film. Control of fouling is discussed in terms of biological principles. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Microbiology
  • Biological Oceanography

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE