Accession Number:

AD0744005

Title:

Mass Transport in Water Waves. Part I. Theory. Part II. Experiments.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE RALPH M PARSONS LAB FOR WATER RESOURCES AND HYDRODYNAMICS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1972-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

290.0

Abstract:

When a fluid is in periodic wave motion, the particles are carried by a varying velocity field. The location of a particle varies as does the immediate velocity field. Fluid particles may have a net mean drift even if the local velocity field has zero mean this is the case in irrotational gravity waves. In viscous fluid, wave-induced Reynolds stress imparts steady momentum to the fluid a steady shear is the set up to balance it, hence a further mean velocity field results. The sum of these two steady currents provides the total drift by which a fluid particle migrates, i.e. mass transport velocity. This report is a description of theoretical and experimental aspects of mass transport by waves. Part I reviews basic assumptions of existing theories. Part II checks and evaluates theoretical deductions in Part I. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Physical and Dynamic Oceanography
  • Civil Engineering
  • Fluid Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE