Accession Number:

AD0731381

Title:

Beaches and Ground Water of Cape Sable, Florida, during Extreme Drought.

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

LOUISIANA STATE UNIV BATON ROUGE COASTAL STUDIES INST

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1971-08-30

Pagination or Media Count:

27.0

Abstract:

In October 1969 beaches and water tables were investigated after 5 months of adequate rainfall in the Cape Sable complex. In April 1971 a similar study was made after 5 months of extreme drought in the Florida Everglades, when water tables were lowered and flattened enough to permit widespread saltwater intrusion. Much of the beach rock and cemented water-table rock under the beaches had been eroded by high-energy waves, probably of Hurricane Laurie 1969 or various local storms. Slabs of the eroded beach rock were tossed up on the beaches, and if sufficiently indurated became incorporated into the deposits. No evidence of subsequent cementation was observed. On East and Northwest capes the ground water had been replaced by stagnant seawater. On Middle Cape the water table was lowered, but a salinity gradient and some potable ground water were present in 1971. The Cape Sable region is isolated from mainland surface runoff by extensive areas of lakes and waterways with seawater salinities, and from subsurface flow of ground water by a thick section of compact marl and compressed peat. Accumulation of ground water depends on local rainfall, and its volume varies with size and permeability of catchment areas. The conclusions of this study are applicable to many other coastal areas and may be useful in assessing their population and survival potentialities. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
  • Civil Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE