Accession Number:

AD0730374

Title:

The Prediction of Individual Differences in Monitoring Performance.

Descriptive Note:

Doctoral thesis,

Corporate Author:

TEXAS TECH UNIV LUBBOCK CENTER OF BIOTECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1971-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

124.0

Abstract:

The discipline of human factors engineering resulted in part from problems having their genesis in the second world war. The technology of war had advanced to the stage where weapon systems had become quite complex both in terms of their operation and maintenance. In many instances it was found that the operating requirements of the system far exceeded the capabilities of its human component. The resulting discipline took as its task the matching of system requirements to human capabilities. One solution, at least in part, has been the elimination of the human component altogether. Consequently many control systems have been designed so as to fully automate many important decision-making functions. Accordingly, mans role in the system has been reduced from an active to a passive component whose primary function is the monitoring of the system in order to insure its proper operation and to prevent certain malfunctions. Consequently the individual monitoring task has come to hold great importance in the proper functioning of many systems. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE