Accession Number:

AD0728728

Title:

General Aviation Structures Directly Responsible for Trauma in Crash Decelerations

Descriptive Note:

Special rept.

Corporate Author:

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION OKLAHOMA CITY OK CIVIL AEROMEDICAL INST

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1971-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

216.0

Abstract:

An analytical study of general aviation accident injuries is presented. Needs for improvement of both the crash design of the interior of the cockpit and the structural integrity of the cockpit itself are clearly illustrated. Crash safety design in light aircraft has fallen so far behind that for the automobile that death rates per 100,000,000 passenger miles in light aircraft are at least seven times those for automotive transportation. The author concludes, after many detailed analyses in this study that many present- day general aviation aircraft with their rigid instrument panels studded with heavy instruments, protruding knobs and sharp edges, along with a lack of slow- return padding and very inadequate restraint equipment, are producing fatal or very serious injuries during low cabin crash decelerations with some as low as 3-4 g. Again based on the authors calculations, it is not uncommon for light aircraft cabins to start to disintegrate andor collapse on the occupants if the crash forces exceed 9 or 10 g. And yet, some manufacturers have produced aircraft for aerial application that have cockpits that can withstand up to 40 g. Engineering design changes can sharply reduce the death and injury rate in general aviation accidents.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Aircraft Operations
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE