Accession Number:

AD0725163

Title:

Defense against Kamikaze Attacks in World War 2 and Its Relevance to Anti-Ship Missile Defense. Volume 1. An Analytical History of Kamikaze Attacks Against Ships of the United States Navy During World War 2

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES ALEXANDRIA VA OPERATIONS EVALUATION GROUP

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1970-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

114.0

Abstract:

This study examines the experience of the United States Navy in countering attacks by Japanese suicide aircraft kamikazes in World War II, and provides an analytical history of the kamikaze program and develops estimates of the effectiveness of the kamikaze and of efforts to counter it. This study begins with a history of the early encounters between Japanese and American carrier aircraft and shows how the patterns of aircraft losses by both sides changed during the war. The effect on Japan of losing aircraft, pilots, aircraft carriers, and other resources is discussed as a background to the decision to employ the kamikaze tactic. A brief chapter addresses the philosophical environment which made the kamikaze tactic acceptable. Then the history of the employment of the kamikaze is discussed in terms of 2 major campaigns--the Philippines and Okinawa. In the discussion of the Okinawa campaign, where the majority of kamikazes were expended, the tactics used by the American Navy in defense are described. Finally, statistics on results in the Philippine and Okinawan campaigns are used to establish estimates of the effectiveness of defense at various stages--attack at the source, defense by interceptors, defense by anti-aircraft guns, and the like. These estimates are used to provide a crude model of overall effectiveness.

Subject Categories:

  • Antiaircraft Defense Systems
  • Naval Surface Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE