Accession Number:

AD0723465

Title:

Physiological Responses in Air Traffic Control Personnel: O'Hare Tower,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CIVIL AEROMEDICAL INST OKLAHOMA CITY OKLA

Report Date:

1971-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

15.0

Abstract:

Physiological and biochemical measurements were made on 22 air traffic controllers at OHare tower during five days of the heavy traffic evening shift 1600-2400 and five days of the light traffic morning shift 0000-0800. Pulse rates were higher on the evening shift than on the morning shift. Converging approaching traffic was more excitatory than departing diverging traffic on the evening shift there was no differential response on the morning shift. Galvanic skin response indicated that adaptation to the morning shift was incomplete in five days. Fibrinogen levels in controllers blood was not elevated above the expected level for their age group. Controllers had a higher total plasma phospholipid concentration than populations of normal people, schizophrenics and combat pilots. Phosphatidyl glycerol was significantly higher in controllers plasma than in the normal population but less than in the combat and schizophrenic populations. Findings from urine analyses that are reported separately by Hale, et al., have been summarized in this report. Urine chemistry shows that catecholamine excretion is related to the number of aircraft operations. Corticoid excretion rises late in the morning shift and recovery from morning shift work is incomplete during the off-duty rest period. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Anatomy and Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE