Accession Number:

AD0707272

Title:

CATECHOLAMINES, CORTICOSTEROIDS AND THYROID HORMONES IN NONSHIVERING THERMOGENESIS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA OTTAWA (ONTARIO) DIV OF BIOSCIENCES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1969-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

Because of the well-established calorigenic action of thyroxine, the increase in heat production resulting from cold exposure and the numerous evidences of an increased thyroid activity in cold-acclimated animals, the thyroid hormones came to be known as the hormones of the slow adaptation to prolonged cold exposure. Moreover, the elevated basal metabolism became generally identified with cold adaptation and considered as the principal adjustment responsible for the increased heat production observed in these animals. In attempting to find the biochemical or enzymatic reactions responsible for this thermogenesis, many investigators turned to factors or chemical reactions which were known to be controlled or at least affected by thyroxine. Studies have revealed that non-shivering thermogenesis mediated through noradrenaline can be accompanied by a combination of high thyroid activity and low adrenocortical activity or the reverse. In general, there is no doubt that both hormones are essential for development of cold adaptation. However, in view of the different patterns of thyroid and adrenal cortex adjustments which can accompany non-shivering thermogenesis, it may be concluded that an hyperactivity of these glands may be relatively unimportant for the maintenance of non-shivering thermogenesis.

Subject Categories:

  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE