Accession Number:

AD0706762

Title:

LEADERSHIP STUDIES OF CHINESE, CHINESE-AMERICANS AND AMERICAN INDIANS.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

WESTERN WASHINGTON STATE COLL BELLINGHAM CENTER FOR CROSS-CULTURAL RESEARCH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1970-05-30

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Studies of leadership effectiveness were conducted in three different cultural settings Hong Kong Chinese, Chinese-Americans who have been born and reared in Hawaii but whose parents grew up in China, and American Indians of the Pacific Northwest. In Hong Kong, the findings were that authoritarian leadership produces a greater degree of cohesiveness of group judgments while both democratic and laissez-faire leadership produce considerably less cohesion. Male leaders produce a greater cohesiveness of judgment than do female leaders. In a boys club setting, authoritarian leadership produced better morale and productivity than democratic leadership. Older followers prefer more authoritarian leadership methods than do younger female followers prefer more authoritarian leadership methods than do males rural followers prefer more authoritarian methods than do urbans. Among Chinese Americans, male leaders are more effective than females in bringing about cohesiveness of judgments but both authoritarian and deomcartic methods produced essentially equal results. The studies with American Indian groups could not be finished and therefore no conclusive results are available. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE