Accession Number:

AD0706666

Title:

SOME FEATURES OF THE WORK OF THE FIRST AID POST AND THE MEDICAL BATTALION IN THE RECEPTION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE CASUALTIES,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

DEFENCE SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION SERVICE OTTAWA (ONTARIO)

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1970-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

3.0

Abstract:

To prevent the contamination of wounds with chemical warfare substances on the field of battle, and also at medical posts in the army area, does not seem to be, as a rule, possible. If a chemical warfare agent gets into a wound on the battle-field before medical aid is given, that is, before the primary bandaging of the wound, neither the patient nor the person applying the dressing will known about the infection of the wound. After arrival of such casualties at the Medical Battalion MB, the greater part of the chemical warfare agent contaminating the wound will, within 8 to 12 hours from the time of wounding or even earlier, have already been absorbed, while part of it will remain on the bandage with the contents of the wound. But if the contaminant just gets onto the bandage after the latter is applied to the wound, then decontamination procedure or changing of the bandage may result in the substances not getting into the wound at all. It should also be pointed out that when there are massive arrivals of chemical warfare casualties at the FAP or MB no indications of chemical warfare substances in wounds will be forthcoming, except in isolated cases. Thus it does not seem a practical possibility to determine which casualties have wounds contaminated with chemical warfare substances and which have non-contaminated wounds. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Weapons Effects (Biological)

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE