Accession Number:

AD0678111

Title:

THE EFFECT OF X-RAYS ON HIGHER NERVOUS ACTIVITY,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OHIO

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1967-12-14

Pagination or Media Count:

16.0

Abstract:

The article summarizes work conducted from 1926 to 1944 on the effect of x-rays on higher nervous activity, specifically conditioned salivation of dogs after exposure of the head to doses frequently used in therapy to brain tumors. After a brief drop, beginning immediately after irradiation, the conditioned reflexes increased to a level above the initial and then dropped sharply. Depending upon the dose used the conditioned-reflex activity increased again after the drop and either attained the norm or remained low, substantially below the norm, for a long time. This prompted the use of x-ray therapy on World War II shell-shock victims. Four case histories are given, revealing partial to complete cure of brain contusions, shell shock, hysteria and contusion-commotio syndrome after 3-5 exposures of afflicted brain areas to doses of 120-180 r. Results are given of exposing the head of dogs to doses commonly applied in the treatment of diseases of the scalp in children 1760 r in four equal doses. Conditioned-reflex activity was impaired for 1-2 months, especially when fairly comlicated tasks were required of the animals, after which the functioning of the cerebral cortex returned to normal. Post-treatment examination 4-6 months is recommended and treatment is contraindicated for children with an injured nervous system. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Radiobiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE