Accession Number:

AD0677208

Title:

INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN OBJECTIVE TESTING

Descriptive Note:

Semiannual technical rept. no. 3, May-Oct 1967

Corporate Author:

SHUFORD-MASSENGILL CORP LEXINGTON MA

Report Date:

1967-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

36.0

Abstract:

With the development of decision-theoretic psychometrics and Valid Confidence Testing, it is now possible to administer objective and semi- objective tests in such a way that guessing is practically eliminated from the test data. In order to estimate the benefits available from the use of these new procedures, it becomes important to estimate the effects of guessing upon test data obtained by using the old methods of administration. Logic and mathematics are used to examine the effects of guessing upon an examinees test score. The decision to guess or not to guess in taking an examination has a great effect on the examinees chances of passing the test. It is possible to evaluate the performance of an objective test not only according to its ability to discriminate between examinees of different ability levels but also according to its ability to discriminate between those who are guessing and those who are not guessing. It is shown that an objective test can be a better test of cultural and educational background than it is of ability level. Thus, the social justice of the older forms of objective test leave much to be desired. These injustices may be eliminated through the application of decision-theoretic psychometrics.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE