Accession Number:

AD0659198

Title:

THE SIZE OF GENETIC PROGRAMS VERSUS THEIR EFFECTIVENESS AND ADAPTABILITY.

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

CALIFORNIA UNIV BERKELEY DEPT OF MATHEMATICS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1967-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

33.0

Abstract:

Organisms are programmed by their genes. The size of the genetic program is related to the complexity of the organism. Greater complexity can give a competitive advantage in solving the complex problems of existence and survival. Each inborn capability Precoordinated muscle movements, an innate communications system, an inborn knowledge about the environment, etc., has a genetic cost. The latter is defined as the minimum size of the genetic program that must be provided to organize the capabilities in question. There is a selective pressure towards larger and larger genetic programs. On the other hand, there is a selective pressure for quick adaptability to environmental changes, and it is shown that this adaptability is roughly inversely proportional to the size of the genetic program. Thus a compromise between innate capabilities and adaptability is necessary. Estimates of the genetic cost of various capabilities are given with special attention to muscle control. Imprinting, learning, and self-organization are discussed in the context of reducing the genetic cost. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Environmental Health and Safety

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE