Accession Number:

AD0655931

Title:

SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND SHIFTING AGRICULTURE OF THE WHITE MEO

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept. no. 2, Nov 1965-Mar 1967

Corporate Author:

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT INST WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1967-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

38.0

Abstract:

The report comprises eight sections. The first concerns itself with introductory remarks by various writers on shifting cultivation as practiced by the Meo the second reviews yields per household in the White Meo communities of Mae Nai and Ban Khae in northern Thailand and describes some ecological considerations of shifting cultivation in those communities. Climatic, edaphic, and biotic environmental distinctions are noted. The later sections deal with site selection, cutting, burning, cropping harvesting, and fallowing in the local agricultural pattern. Swidden farming follows a locally determined, well- defined pattern. Primary forest land is preferred because of superior soils and the requirements of rice cultivation, even though secondary forests are less difficult to clear. Techniques of cultivation differ from area to area and often from village to village. Swiddens often are planted to a number of crops. Intercropping is primarily in corn-opium swiddens. There is an overlapping of plantings and harvests in many swiddens which lasts until the swidden is fallowed. Intercropping and the succession of crops, especially alternation of wet season cereals and dry season opium and legumes, amounts to crop rotation on a limited scale. Swidden farming requires more labor than permanent wet rice cultivation. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE