Accession Number:

AD0651974

Title:

PROLONGED STRESS IN SEALAB II: A FIELD STUDY OF INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP REACTIONS

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.

Corporate Author:

YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CT

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1967-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

96.0

Abstract:

An investigation was made of individual and group reactions to extreme, prolonged stress in a field situation conducted as part of Project SEALAB II. The 28 divers completed personality and demographic questionnaires prior to submersion. While underwater, they filled out checklists and were continuously monitored by closed-circuit audio and television. Divers underwater were significantly more fearful and aroused than on the surface prior to submersion. The three 10 men teams which lived together underwater became significantly more cohesive after submersion. Evaluation of sociometric choices of leaders indicated that age and maturity were the only characteristics associated with being chosen as a leader. Performance, fear, arousal, gregariousness and choice as a peer were not related to leader choice. Self- reported fear and arousal were significantly correlated with performance criteria. The more frightened and aroused divers demonstrated inferior performance. First-born and only children were significantly more frightened and showed significantly poorer performance than later-borns. Failure of an individual to share in group activities and social behavior was associated with higher levels of reported stress and inferior performance. Using six predictors in a multiple regression, it was possible to account for 50 of the variance of each of three objective performance criteria. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE