Accession Number:

AD0644930

Title:

CORROSION OF METALS IN TROPICAL ENVIRONMENTS. PART 7. COPPER AND COPPER ALLOYS. SIXTEEN YEARS' EXPOSURE

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept.

Corporate Author:

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC

Report Date:

1966-10-28

Pagination or Media Count:

29.0

Abstract:

The corrosion of copper and nine wrought copper alloys is reported for exposures in five tropical environments for one, two, four, eight, and sixteen years. Weight loss, pitting, and change in tensile strength were measured to evaluate corrosion resistance. Higher corrosion rates are shown for tropical sea water immersion and tropical marine atmosphere than similar exposures in temperate climates. Of the various alloys studied, 5 Al bronze showed the highest general corrosion resistance its 16-year losses in sea water were only 15 that of copper. Copper and the high-copper alloys were resistant to all environments and generally had decreasing corrosion rates with time of exposure. Tensile tests revealed heavy dezincification in the lower-copper brasses when exposed in marine environments, and for two of the brasses in fresh water immersion. As a result of the decreasing corrosion rates or dezincification, antifouling properties of copper alloys decreased with time of exposure. All were moderately to heavily fouled after 16 years in sea water. Galvanic effects were pronounced in tropical sea water. The corrosion of copper alloys was accelerated appreciably by contact with stainless steel 316 of 17 their area, while similar carbon steel strips gave effective cathodic protection of plates of brass and bronze over the long term.

Subject Categories:

  • Properties of Metals and Alloys

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE