Accession Number:

AD0627531

Title:

ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF LAKE TEMPERATURES IN CENTRAL CANADA AS OBSERVED FROM THE AIR.

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

WISCONSIN UNIV MADISON DEPT OF METEOROLOGY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1965-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

44.0

Abstract:

Lake surface temperatures in central Canada were observed from the air with an infrared thermometer during spring and fall of 1963 and 1964. The surface temperatures of up to 300 lakes, separated by as much as 700 miles, were obtained on each of several days. The relation between these observed temperatures and meteorological, morphological, and geographical parameters was investigated. Using multiple regression equations, the temperature data were represented as a function of latitude, longitude, size S, and S square. The computed isotherms of lake temperature were generally oriented northwest-southeast, in a pattern similar to the mean air temperature isotherms for the previous month. The regression surfaces also showed that the strongest gradient of lake surface temperatures was near the zone of frozen lakes. The fetch and depth of a lake were found to influence lake surface temperatures, i.e. large, deep lakes are colder than small, shallow lakes in spring and warmer in fall. Linear regression analysis implied that fetch alone is a relatively poor predictor of surface temperature. The relation between mean depth and lake surface temperature appeared to be non-linear. Large diurnal changes and the effect of the wind on lake surface temperature were observed during spring and summer. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Meteorology
  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE