Accession Number:

AD0619238

Title:

SHAPE AND SIZE DISCRIMINATION IN OCTOPUS: THE EFFECTS OF PRETAINING ALONG DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

OXFORD UNIV (ENGLAND) INST OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Report Date:

1963-02-28

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

It has been suggested that discrimination learning involves two processes. Animals learn first to switch-in a stimulus-analysing mechanism that yields different outputs for the discriminanda and, secondly, they learn to attach the correct responses to those outputs. This hypothesis predicts that training an animal to respond to one cue should make it more difficult for it to learn to respond to a second type of cue. Previous experiments have shown that when animals trained to respond to one cue are subsequently presented with a problem that can be solved in terms of that cue or in terms of a second cue they do learn something about the second cue. The crucial question for the model proposed is not whether, under these conditions, animals learn something about a second cue, but whether they learn as much as animals not previously trained to respond to the first cue. The present experiment attempts to answer this question. Sixteen octopuses were trained and tested in three stages. In Stage I, one group learned a size discrimination, the other group learned a shape discrimination. In Stage II, all animals learned a new problem. This problem was the same for both groups and could be solved in terms of shape or size differences or both. In Stage III, transfer tests were given with the same shapes as those used in Stage II but no differences in size were present. Author

Subject Categories:

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE