Accession Number:

AD0617578

Title:

SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE DECAMETRIC RADIATION FROM JUPITER IN 1961,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

FLORIDA UNIV GAINESVILLE DEPT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

Report Date:

1964-04-04

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

Observations of the sporadic radiation from Jupiter were made in 1961 at observatories in Florida, in Australia, and in Chile, at various frequencies from 5 Mcs to 85.5 Mcs. A method was developed for computing the mean flux density for the apparition from measurements of peak flux density in consecutive 10-min intervals. Occurrence probability, peak flux density, and mean flux density for the apparition were determined as functions of frequency, and all three quantities were found to decrease monotonically with increase in frequency above 10 Mcs. The decrease in mean flux density with increasing frequency indicated a spectral index in excess of 5.2 over much of the observed spectrum. Peak flux densities at 5 Mcs and 10 Mcs were about 10 to the minus 19th power Wsq m cs. No activity was detected at 85.5 Mcs. The ratio of mean flux density to peak flux density for 1-min intervals during noise storms was found to be essentially independent of frequency, suggesting that there is no appreciable change of noise-burst shape with frequency. The mean power emitted at decameter wavelengths by Jupiter in 1961 was estimated to be about 5 X 10 to the 10th power watts, which is 1 or 2 orders of magnitude greater than that emitted at decimeter wavelengths. The average efficiency with which the solar-wind power incident on the Jovian magnetosphere is converted into decametric radiation power was estimated to be about 0.00001. Author

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Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE