Accession Number:

AD0613628

Title:

THE ECONOMICS OF HOUSING SEGREGATION,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CALIF

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1965-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

30.0

Abstract:

This monograph attempts to separate the observed segregation of nonwhites in U. S. cities into that which is attributable to socio-economic differences between races and that which is attributable to prejudice. The results should have practical relevance where there is a desire to reduce segregation, and a choice must be made on the efficacy of, e.g., fair housing laws versus policies designed to raise the relative income levels of nonwhites. The major hypothesis tested is that all observed residential segregation is socio-economic in character, i.e., is attributable to whitenonwhite differentials in income and wealth, family size and composition, and the job location of its working members. This hypothesis proved untenable and this conclusion was supported by supplementary tests. Neither could much of a case be made for voluntary segregation by nonwhites as an explanation of their residential pattern. Author

Subject Categories:

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE