Accession Number:

AD0606346

Title:

BIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN ACOUSTIC SYSTEMS (BEHAVIOR OF FISHES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THEIR SENSORY CAPACITIES).

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.,

Corporate Author:

MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK

Report Date:

1964-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

The prime objective was to ascertain the functional significance of sound production in a variety of fishes. In order to understand any animal communication system thoroughly it is necessary to consider the ecological and physiological controls of sound production, hearing and behavior. A second requisite is to select animals that are good experimental subjects. Many sound producing fish are not but toadfish, squirrelfish, a freshwater minnow, the croaking gourami and the fiddler crab do exhibit acoustic behavior under conditions that allow for detailed study. A start has also been made in a study of the orientation mechanisms of one group of fishes. Finally we should be able to comprehend more fully the perceptual world of aquatic animals through an understanding of how the sense organs and central nervous system records and transmits information. The report is organized so that summaries of papers either published or in press are given first. After that briefer summaries are given of work in the experimental or analysis stage. Author

Subject Categories:

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE