Accession Number:

AD0602332

Title:

THE ROLE OF BACTERIA IN ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION OF STEEL IN SEA WATER

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1964-06-18

Pagination or Media Count:

15.0

Abstract:

Bacteria play a role of biological depolarizers and activators in the process of electrochemical corrosion of steel in sea water. The role of bacteria is very important in the initial period when they activate the metal surface and accelerate the formation of microgalvanic elements. Later on, corrosion of the metal becomes apparent due to increased use of molecular hydrogen and depolarization of the cathode, and due to the work of the galvanic pairs which is maintained by the anode process and by the bacteriogenic hydrogen sulfide contacting the metal. Only intensely reproducing bacteria with a well-expressed production of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia enhance the biological corrosion of carbon steel. Most of the cultures studied cause biological corrosion of carbon steel leading to a significant loss of metal.

Subject Categories:

  • Biological Oceanography
  • Physical Chemistry

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE