Accession Number:

AD0489327

Title:

THE USE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION IN THE STUDY OF PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES AND SURFACES.

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.,

Corporate Author:

TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN LABS FOR ELECTRONICS AND RELATED SCIENCE RESEARCH

Report Date:

1965-08-15

Pagination or Media Count:

100.0

Abstract:

Various techniques employing electromagnetic radiation are presently being used in the study of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. These techniques generally make use of either thermal radiation from the planet itself or solar radiation that is reflected and scattered from the surface and atmosphere of the planet. Such measurements are made from earth-based observation points. Radio astronomy uses radio techniques to measure such quantities as the surface temperature of the planet and the polarization of any nonthermal radiation from the planet. Radar astronomy uses both pulsed and continuous wave radar. These radars can be used to study the surface roughness of a planet, its rotation rate, and the density of its ionosphere. Infrared astronomy is used in the study of the emission and absorption bands in a planetary atmosphere. Visual astronomy enables the observation of surface features such as clouds and haze. Close-up observations are possible when a spaceprobe such as Mariner 4 is occulted by a planet and its atmosphere. The expected diffraction pattern or signals from the spacecraft can be computed. Such was done for Mariner 4 for the upper and lower probable limits of the Martian atmosphere and the results are reported here. The computed diffraction curves can be compared with those actually obtained from the spaceprobe when they are availabe, and the better model of the atmosphere determined. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Astrophysics
  • Radiofrequency Wave Propagation
  • Unmanned Spacecraft

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE