Accession Number:

AD0485674

Title:

RESEARCH IN RING TRANSMITTER TECHNIQUES

Descriptive Note:

Technical summary rept. no. 3, 1 Jan-31 May 1965

Corporate Author:

STANFORD RESEARCH INST MENLO PARK CA

Report Date:

1965-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

38.0

Abstract:

The ring transmitter is a device for the generation of very high peak power radio-frequency pulses. Transmitter and antenna are combined in a single unit, which can excite a dish or be an element of an array. The ring consists of capacitors charged in parallel, each capacitor separated from its neighbors by spark gaps. The capacitors are discharged in series, through fast switches, to form a highly-selective resonant circuit, which is loaded primarily by its own radiation resistance. The fast switches are usually pressurized, triggered spark gaps which allow an RF pulse to be turned on with a pulse-to-pulse jitter less than 5 nsec. Recent measurements indicate that jitter times below 1 nsec may be attainable. A working model 20-Mc ring transmitter giving 3-Mw peak power pulses of 1 microsecond duration and two 6-Mc transmitters 1-2 Mw have been built to date. The 6-Mc rings have been successfully triggered sequentially to produce a single coherent pulse of double length. Thus, it appears that CW power can be generated by using a number of rings fired sequentially. Studies have shown that passive circuit elements, coupled to the main ring, can be used to modify the pulse shape and length. In this manner, pulses of lengths 4-50 microsec have been obtained from the 6-Mc rings.

Subject Categories:

  • Radio Communications

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE