Accession Number:

AD0415373

Title:

IMPORTANCE OF STOMACH AND OTHER EXTRATHYROIDAL, EXTRARENAL AVENUES OF IODIDE LOSS DURING THYROID UPTAKE TESTS,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE BROOKS AFB TEX

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1963-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

The results of the study show that although the thyroid gland and the kidneys usually are considered the two main organs in direct competition for blood iodide, actually there are at least seven other organs, each of which, during the first 2 hours after iodide administration, may remove more iodide than does the thyroid gland itself. Even at the end of 18 hours, the thyroid gland may accumulate only 20 of the radioactive iodide found in the body at that time. Thyroid uptake tests employing radioactive iodide may be grossly influenced by the stomach, which normally accumulates iodide actively at a high organblood gradient. Under certain conditions such as vomiting or aspiration, this may result in removal of an exceedingly large amount of the iodide test dose before it can be accumulated by the thyroid gland. Under other conditions, such as in achlorhydria or gastrectomy, it may hold little iodide, resulting in blood concentrations of iodide remaining higher than normal, thus permitting the thyroid to remove more iodide than normally. Any combination of these conditions probably would seriously influence thyroid uptake studies. Author

Subject Categories:

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE