Accession Number:

AD0248069

Title:

STONEMAN 2 TEST OF RECLAMATION PERFORMANCE. VOLUME 2. PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF WET DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURES

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

NAVAL RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE LAB SAN FRANCISCO CA

Report Date:

1960-07-21

Pagination or Media Count:

177.0

Abstract:

The basic decontanination procedures firehosing, motorized flushing, and scrubbing evaluated during the STONEMAN I field teats in 1956 provided a generally high fallout removal effectiveness of 98 percent or more. This was due to the visual rate control which allowed the recovery operations to progress only as fast as the simulated fallout material appeared to be removed. For this reason the cost of recovery approached the maximum in terms of effort and water requirements. Since in many situations there may not be adequate water supplies available for large scale decontamination operations, it appeared desirable to lower the water consumption and also the manpower effort, and supply requirements to determine the influence on the decontamination effectiveness. A series of tests was, therefore, conducted to improve the performance of wet decontamination procedures. Synthetic fallout made of tagged processed soils was dispersed over pavements and roofs so as to simulate the deposition of actual fallout resulting from land surface detonations of nuclear weapons. Removal effectiveness and effort data were obtained on motorized flushing and firehosing of paved areas. Direct firehosing with fan-shaped streams and lobbing of standard firestreams were perftraed on roof areas. The performance of motorized flushing was superior to that of firehosing both from the standpoint of removal effectiveness and effort expended. Portland cement concrete surfaces were consistently easier to clean than asphaltic concrete for either type of decontamination procedure. An improvised street flusher attachment was found to be satisfactory and its performance was competitive with the conventional flusher tested. For roofing surfaces no rougher than composition shingles, lobbing of firestreams from ground level appears to offer the same degree od effectiveness as direct firehosing.

Subject Categories:

  • Radiation Pollution and Control

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE