Accession Number : ADA637074


Title :   A Historical Summary of the Work of the Corps of Engineers in Washington D.C. and Vicinity 1852 - 1952


Corporate Author : CORPS OF ENGINEERS WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON DISTRICT


Personal Author(s) : Duryee, Sacket L


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a637074.pdf


Report Date : Jan 1952


Pagination or Media Count : 152


Abstract : In the building up of the Nation's Capital, many men have given their dreams and their energy. This book traces only a small thread in this stream of effort - the part of the Corps of Engineers in the transformation of Washington from the Great Serbonian Bog of its earlier days to its present position as a focal point of world attention. The story begins a hundred years ago . In 1852, Congress directed that there be undertaken surveys projects and estimates for determining the best means of affording the cities of Washington and Georgetown an unfailing and abundant supply of good and wholesome water. In 1853 Lieutenant of Engineers Montgomery C. Meigs made his report. He spoke of the virtues of water with considerable feeling, or to quote him : the same feeling that makes the rude but devout Arab invoke the blessings of Allah upon the builder of the murmuring fountain. He recommended that the city's water supply be taken from above Great Falls on the Potomac River and conveyed to it by gravity throughout. He rejected the scheme to use Rock Creek as a source. His estimate of cost was one million nine hundred and twenty-one thousand dollars, for which he guaranteed an everlasting daily supply of 36 million gallons. Meigs was a colorful character. He fought with the Secretary of War and was banished to Key West only to be recalled by Congress because he alone had been designated by name to pay the bills. He had his name cast into the riser of each iron step of the spiral staircases that lead to the pipe chambers. He built the longest stone arch bridge in the world to carry the conduit over Cabin John Creek, and he put Jefferson Davis' name on it. This, the Secretary of Interior chiselled off during the Civil War. He also directed the construction of the dome and the wings of the Capitol, an addition to the Old Post Office, the National Museum, and the Pension Building.


Descriptors :   *ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS , *HISTORY , *MILITARY ENGINEERING , *POTOMAC RIVER , *RIVERS , BRIDGES , CONGRESS , ENERGY , MILITARY ENGINEERS , MILITARY FACILITIES , MUSEUMS , NAVIGATION , ROADS , ROCK , STREAMS , SUPPLIES , URBAN AREAS , WATER RESOURCES


Subject Categories : Humanities and History
      Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
      Civil Engineering
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE