Accession Number : ADA626965


Title :   Examination of Urinary Beta-Naphthol as a Biomarker Indicative of Jet Fuel Exposures


Descriptive Note : Interim rept. Jan 2014-Apr 2015


Corporate Author : HENRY M JACKSON FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MILITARY MEDICINE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH


Personal Author(s) : Frey, Jeanette S ; Bihl, Trevor J ; Kobayashi, Asao ; Mitchell, Stephen W ; Dillard, Scott C ; Mattie, David R ; Mauzy, Camilla A


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a626965.pdf


Report Date : Apr 2015


Pagination or Media Count : 37


Abstract : A joint US Air Force/Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) study was conducted to examine molecular responses in a human cohort occupationally exposed to either JP-4 or JP-8. In this sub-study, we examined the utility of urinary beta-naphthol (uBetaNph) as a biomarker of exposure to jet fuels. Beta-naphthol is a metabolic product of naphthalene, a poly aromatic hydrocarbon found in jet fuel. Published studies using human occupational exposure samples indicated that urinary increases in BetaNph correlate well with jet fuel exposure levels. This study used a Beta-naphthol competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to quantitate urine samples taken from subjects (18-50 yrs old) prior to shift or immediately post-shift. Exposed group subjects worked in occupations (crew chief, flight line personnel) with likely jet fuel exposures, while the control group was matched for location but in occupations with no expected exposure (office workers). Both JP-4 and JP-8 exposure/control group urine samples were collected and analyzed for BetaNph as well as uBEtaNph - urinary BetaNph normalized with creatinine levels to account for urine volume dilution. Statistical analyses of the meta data and uBetaNph included standard analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test, factor analysis, dimensionality assessment, and correlation figures. Unlike other studies, we did not see any correlation to exposure group, nor did we see indications that smoking was a confounding factor in our analyses. However, our data suggested that age does correlate with BetaNph levels. Further studies using a larger cohort and accurate quantitation of jet fuel dose should clarify issues seen in this study with the use of uBetaNph as a urinary biomarker of jet fuel exposure.


Descriptors :   *BLADDER(URINARY) , *EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY) , *HUMAN BODY , *JET ENGINE FUELS , AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS , ENZYMES , GENETIC MARKERS , IMMUNOASSAY , METABOLISM , MOLECULES , NAPHTHALENES , OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES , STATISTICAL ANALYSIS


Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Fuels


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE