Accession Number : ADA625999


Title :   Weight Change Following US Military Service


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA


Personal Author(s) : Littman, Alyson J ; Jacobson, Isabel G ; Boyko, Edward J ; Powell, Teresa M ; Smith, Tyler C


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a625999.pdf


Report Date : 10 Apr 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 12


Abstract : Background: Although obesity is less prevalent among active-duty military personnel compared with similar persons not serving in the military, no such difference has been seen between veterans and nonveterans. Purpose: To compare the trajectory of weight change between personnel on active duty and those who separate from the military, and to evaluate how these changes differ depending on demographic, service-related, and psychological characteristics. Methods: We used data from the baseline (2001) and follow-up (2004 and 2007) Millennium Cohort Study (n=38,686). We estimated average annual and 6-year weight changes as well as multivariable adjusted odds ratios of clinically important weight gain (10%). Analyses were conducted in 2010. Results: Individuals gained a substantial amount of weight (7 8 pounds) around the time of their separation from service. While the rate of annual weight gain among those leaving service returned to the rate of continuing service members, the additional weight gained after separation was not lost. Consequently, 6-year weight gain in separators was 4 to 5 pounds greater than in those who did not separate (12 13 pounds vs. 8 pounds). Subgroups that were at increased risk of weight gain following separation included active duty (vs. Reserve/National Guard), those who were depressed, and deployers with combat exposures (vs. nondeployers). Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence for an increased rate of weight gain around the time of military separation that may explain previously reported higher rates of overweight and obesity in veterans. High-risk subgroups identified may require enhanced resources to prevent unhealthy weight gain.


Descriptors :   *BODY WEIGHT , *VETERANS(MILITARY PERSONNEL) , DEPLOYMENT , POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER , RISK , STATISTICAL ANALYSIS


Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Statistics and Probability
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE