Accession Number : ADA621174


Title :   Mexico Burning: Does America Stand Idly By?


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Robinson, Christopher M


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a621174.pdf


Report Date : Jun 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 96


Abstract : This thesis provides a historical background of the evolution of violence in Mexico s ongoing commercialist insurgency and presents a case study of PLAN COLOMBIA, analysis, several potential courses of action for US assistance, and policy recommendations. The author begins by exploring four key phases of Mexico s ongoing conflict and explains how escalation of violence has transformed what was once transnational criminal activity into an insurgency. He then provides a detailed overview of US policy toward Mexico. He examines the George W. Bush administration policy which saw a dramatic increase in focus and funding following the attacks of September 11th, 2001 before moving onto Obama administration policy which refocused resources to stemming problems on the US side of the border. He then delves into US organizational boundaries which insert inefficiency, fuel resource battles, and slow down the decision chain. He subsequently addresses the US policy of treating the insurgency in Mexico as a law enforcement issue and its implications. The author provides case study of US involvement in reestablishing rule of law in Colombia. It details how the narcotics trade funded the Colombian communist revolutionary group known as the FARC and how expanding violence eroded the Colombian government s legitimacy and control of territory. He discusses how PLAN COLOMBIA provided US training, advisors, intelligence, funding and equipment to reverse the tide of the insurgency. He explains how the situation in Mexico is similar to that of Colombia in the 1990s as well as where it is different. To conclude, the author provides criteria and metrics that should be met before Mexico is considered stabilized and outlines courses of action to help Mexico reestablish rule of law for US consideration. These include a return to the Merida Initiative, increased US intervention, and a discontinuation of US aid to Mexico.


Descriptors :   *DRUG SMUGGLING , *FOREIGN POLICY , *GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , *INSURGENCY , *MEXICO , *UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT , CASE STUDIES , COLOMBIA , HISTORY , INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS , MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , MILITARY FORCES(UNITED STATES) , THESES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Sociology and Law
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE