Accession Number : ADA619598


Title :   Interaction of Jet Fuel Hydrocarbon Components with Red Blood Cells and Hemoglobin


Descriptive Note : Interim rept. Aug 2013-Jun 2014


Corporate Author : AIR FORCE RESEARCH LAB WRIGHT PATTERSON AFB OH HUMAN PERFORMANCE WING (711TH) HUMAN EFFECTIVENESS DIR/ BIOEFFECTS DIVISION


Personal Author(s) : Jacobsen, Jason J ; Polito, III, Anthony B ; Chapleau, Richard R ; Maurer, Elizabeth I ; Frey, Jeanette S ; Bihl, Trevor J ; Mauzy, Camilla A


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a619598.pdf


Report Date : 24 Jun 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 46


Abstract : This study examined the impact of five jet fuel hydrocarbon components on red blood cells (RBCs). We examined the biochemical changes to RBCs by measuring mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and red cell distribution width (RDW). Exposed cells were imaged using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to verify morphological changes. The induction of oxidative stress was examined using glutathione (GSH) depletion as a marker of reactive oxygen species. Finally, microscale thermophoresis (MST) was used to determine the binding interactions between human hemoglobin and the test set of hydrocarbon compounds. For some chemicals, MCV (toluene, decane), RDW (toluene, octane, ethylbenzene), and MCH (ethylbenzene) values were sensitive to exposure incubation temperatures (room temperature versus 37 oC). SEMimaging indicated formation of 1% crenated red blood cells in all lower dose exposure sets. Dose dependent oxidative stress was seen for all chemical exposures with the exception of high concentrations of tetradecane and toluene. MST revealed binding affinities between purified human hemoglobin monomer and the hydrocarbons decane (KD = 2.4 micro M), tetradecane (KD = 8.8 micro M), and octane (KD = 5.6 micro M), with toluene demonstrating the tightest binding to hemoglobin at KD = 1.9 micro M. Collectively, the apparent increase in the surface area of the cell membrane, GSH depletion, and interaction between the hydrocarbon and hemoglobin molecule may contribute to potential toxicity of these chemicals causing adverse effects on hemodynamics and circulatory function.


Descriptors :   *BIOCHEMISTRY , *BLOOD CELLS , *HEMOGLOBIN , *HYDROCARBONS , *JET ENGINE FUELS , BENZENE , DECANES , EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY) , GLUTATHIONE , LEUKOCYTES , SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY , STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY) , TOLUENES , TOXICITY


Subject Categories : Biochemistry
      Anatomy and Physiology
      Fuels


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE