Accession Number : ADA619480


Title :   Eyes of the Storm: Can Fusion Centers Play a Crucial Role During the Response Phase of Natural Disasters Through Collaborative Relationships With Emergency Operations Centers?


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA CENTER FOR HOMELAND DEFENSE AND SECURITY


Personal Author(s) : Coyle, Timothy P


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a619480.pdf


Report Date : Sep 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 119


Abstract : Through the maturation of the national network of fusion centers, processes and capabilities originally designed to detect and thwart terrorist attacks are now applied to disaster responses. The fusion process, which involves the synthesis and analysis of streams of data, can create incident specific intelligence. The sharing of this information can enhance the operating picture that is critical to key decision makers and the discipline of emergency management. This thesis examined three case studies of fusion center disaster responses through a collaborative-based analytical framework. The resulting analysis of the case studies identified the crucial role played by fusion centers in responding to disaster events in a collaborative effort with emergency operations centers. This thesis concludes that fusion centers offer the greatest impact through enabling information sharing throughout the response phase. The specific benefits of the sharing of information directly influence executive briefings and the deployment of resources. This thesis also modeled a collaborative response. The research determined that the depth and breadth of these relationships involving cooperative responses must be proportionate to the incident and include a level of redundancy. Through a system design model, overconnectivity through efficiency was shown to increase the likelihood of fracturing cooperative relationships.


Descriptors :   *HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE , *INFORMATION EXCHANGE , *INTERAGENCY COORDINATION , CASE STUDIES , COLLABORATIVE TECHNIQUES , DECISION MAKING , EFFICIENCY , INTELLIGENCE , MANAGEMENT , NATURAL DISASTERS , REQUIREMENTS , RESPONSE , THESES


Subject Categories : Administration and Management
      Information Science
      Government and Political Science
      Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE