Accession Number : ADA617715


Title :   An Intervention Study Examining the Effects of Condom Wrapper Graphics and Scent on Condom Use in the Botswana Defence Force


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA


Personal Author(s) : Tran, Bonnie R ; Thomas, Ann G ; Vaida, Florin ; Ditsela, Mooketsi ; Phetogo, Robert ; Kelapile, David ; Haubrich, Richard ; Chambers, Christina ; Shaffer, Richard A


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a617715.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 12


Abstract : Free condoms provided by the government are often not used by Botswana Defence Force (BDF) personnel due to a perceived unpleasant scent and unattractive wrapper. Formative work with the BDF found that scented condoms and military-inspired (camouflage) wrapper graphics were appealing to personnel. A non-randomized intervention study was implemented to determine whether condom wrapper graphics and scent improved condom use in the BDF. Four military sites were selected for participation. Two sites in the south received the intervention condom wrapped in a generic wrapper and two sites in the north received the intervention condom wrapped in a military-inspired wrapper; intervention condoms were either scented or unscented. Two hundred and eleven male soldiers who ever had sex, aged 18 30 years, and stationed at one of the selected sites consented to participate. Sexual activity and condom use were measured pre- and post-intervention using sexual behavior diaries. A condom use rate (CUR; frequency of protected sex divided by the total frequency of sex) was computed for each participant. Mean CURs significantly increased over time (85.7% baseline vs. 94.5% post-intervention). Adjusted odds of condom use over time were higher among participants who received the intervention condom packaged in the military wrapper compared with the generic wrapper. Adjusted odds of condom use were also higher for participants who reported using scented vs. unscented condoms. Providing scented condoms and condoms packaged in a miltiary-inspired wrapper may help increase condom use and reduce HIV infection among military personnel.


Descriptors :   *HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES , *INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION , *MILITARY PERSONNEL , BASE LINES , MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , PACKAGING , SMELL , STATISTICAL ANALYSIS


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research
      Medical Facilities, Equipment and Supplies
      Microbiology
      Military Forces and Organizations


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE