Accession Number : ADA614245


Title :   Work and Rest Patterns and Psychomotor Vigilance Performance of Crewmemebers of the USS Jason Dunham: A Comparison of the 3/9 and 6/6 Watchstanding Schedules


Descriptive Note : Technical rept. Oct 2013-Sep 2014


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF OPERATIONS RESEARCH


Personal Author(s) : Shattuck, Nita L ; Matsangas, Panagiotis


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a614245.pdf


Report Date : 31 Dec 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 61


Abstract : This study compares the patterns of crew rest and sleep, psychomotor vigilance performance, and work demands/rest opportunities afforded by two different schedules, the 3-hour on/9-hour off ( 3/9 ) and the 6-hour on/6-hour off ( 6/6 ) watchstanding schedules. The study was conducted aboard the USS Jason Dunham, a U.S. Navy destroyer operating in the vicinity of the Persian Gulf during the months of November and December 2012. Of the 122 participants in the overall study, 52 were shift workers using either the 3/9 (n=41) or the 6/6 (n=11) schedules. These 52 individuals are the focus of the current analysis. Although sleep deprivation was evident in both watch schedules, results show that crewmembers on the 3/9 received more sleep than their peers on the 6/6, with 6.46 0.77 hours versus 5.89 0.87 hours, respectively. The 3/9 schedule, compared to the 6/6, was also better in terms of the distribution of sleep episodes across the day. Specifically, crewmembers on the 3/9 received more sleep during nighttime hours, whereas crewmembers on the 6/6 had to sleep during the day to compensate for their lack of sleep during nighttime hours. In terms of work demands, crewmembers on the 6/6 schedule have considerably long workdays, with, on average, 15 hours on duty, which corresponds to approximately 30% more time on duty than allocated in the Navy Standard Work Week criterion (on average, 105 hours compared to 81 hours weekly). The two schedules differed significantly in the variability of psychomotor vigilance performance; specifically, crewmembers on the 6/6 schedule had larger variability than those on the 3/9 in 11 of the 13 Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) metrics analyzed (p0.05). The average value of the PVT scores was better on the 3/9 compared to the 6/6, but not at statistically significant levels.


Descriptors :   *NAVAL PERSONNEL , *SLEEP , FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY) , METRICS , PATTERNS , PERFORMANCE(HUMAN) , PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION , SCHEDULING , SLEEP DEPRIVATION , WATCH(DUTY)


Subject Categories : Anatomy and Physiology
      Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE