Accession Number : ADA607499


Title :   United States Marine Corps Assault Amphibian Vehicle Egress Study


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA


Personal Author(s) : Ford, Jason T


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a607499.pdf


Report Date : Jun 2014


Pagination or Media Count : 147


Abstract : Due to the cancellation of the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) program, the Marine Corps have begun developing the Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) to replace the 42-year-old Assault Amphibian Vehicle (AAV). Because the ACV will not be fielded until 2022, the AAV is being modified to improve its survivability. Upgrades to the AAV will make it heavier and, therefore, will make it sink faster. This thesis explores the factors that give Marines the best chance for surviving a sinking AAV. A 2 (17 vs. 21 embarked infantry) x 2 (daylight vs. restricted lighting) x 3 (combinations of armor and floatation devices) x 6 (combinations of egress or evacuation and number of hatches) full factorial experiment was conducted at Camp Pendleton, CA, in August 2012. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified specific factor combinations that yielded the lowest egress times. Specifically, subjects who left their weapons and body armor and exited through the two rear cargo hatches had the best chance of survival. This thesis provides baseline results for future emergency egress studies on the AAV and the new ACV.


Descriptors :   *AMPHIBIOUS VEHICLES , *BODY ARMOR , *COMBAT VEHICLES , EMERGENCIES , EVACUATION , HATCHES , INFANTRY , LIGHTING EQUIPMENT , MARINE CORPS PERSONNEL , THESES


Subject Categories : Surface Effect Vehicles & Amphibious Vehicles


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE