Accession Number : ADA606211


Title :   The Canadian Forces Use of Private Security in Afghanistan: A Consequence of National Decisions


Corporate Author : ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Noel, Stephen D


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a606211.pdf


Report Date : 10 Dec 2013


Pagination or Media Count : 59


Abstract : Since the end of the Cold War, cuts to Canadian defense spending by successive national governments have caused gaps in National Defense. The number of soldiers, particularly those in support trades has decreased. This is concurrent to an increase in the number of tasks, both domestically and internationally that the Canadian Government has given the Department of National Defense. This has given rise to the use of Private Security Companies by the Canadian Forces. The number of Private Security Companies employed by Canada increased in Afghanistan from 2005 to 2011. While there has been a great deal written on the moral, legal and ethical issues associated with using private security to augment the Canadian Forces capability, there has not been a detailed examination of the causes that led to the requirement to use Private Security Companies. The evidence suggests that the augmentation requirement is a natural result of decisions made at the national political level. The value of this study is to increase decision makers understanding of the impact of private security augmentation on Canadian Forces operations in future conflicts. By informing the military, the Canadian Forces can operationalize planning for the use of private security in future conflicts.


Descriptors :   *DECISION MAKING , *NATIONAL SECURITY , AFGHANISTAN , CANADA , LAW ENFORCEMENT , MILITARY BUDGETS , MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN) , POLITICAL SCIENCE , UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT


Subject Categories : Civil Defense
      Defense Systems


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE