Accession Number : ADA602397


Title :   C-STARS Baltimore Simulation Center Military Trauma Training Program: Training for High Performance Trauma Teams


Descriptive Note : Final rept. Oct 2010-Sep 2013


Corporate Author : SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE WRIGHT PATTERSON AFB OH


Personal Author(s) : Grissom, Thomas E ; Whitehorn, David ; Graybill, Bruce ; Brown, Andrew ; Halcome, Charles ; Miller, Kari ; Casey, Jonathan ; Frank, Kirsten ; Miller, Catriona ; Shackelford, Stacy ; Fang, Raymond


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a602397.pdf


Report Date : 19 Sep 2013


Pagination or Media Count : 190


Abstract : During periods of peacetime, human patient simulation will provide hands-on training for military medical personnel for wartime-specific requirements. The Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS), Baltimore and the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center (STC) collaborated to create a jointly funded simulation center to support this need as well as training for civilian trauma programs. A 1200-sq ft area conveniently located in STC opened in February 2012 equipped with four dedicated trauma bays, course management software, and advanced digital audio-video recording capacities. The center contains additional space for storage, a control room, and adjacent debriefing/conference space to support both the C-STARS and STC training missions. To date, over 500 military trainees and several civilian programs have made use of the new center. Additional work under this program included the development of four military-specific, multi-patient scenarios. These scenarios supplemented the previous C-STARS curriculum to replicate a high-workload setting and support discussion of teamwork and leadership in a high-stress environment. Finally, the completed work included an assessment of debriefing modalities. Twenty-four Air Force medical teams were evaluated for clinical and behavioral performance during recorded, simulated trauma resuscitations to determine whether a structured briefing (plus-delta, PD) influenced subsequent performance as compared to a more reflective style of debriefing (debriefing with good judgment, DGJ). Video review of before-after performance following debriefing showed no change in behavioral or clinical performance related to the debriefing style. Clinical performance did improve slightly, most likely because of practice. Recommendations from this study include a preference for the PD style when primary training focus is on technical or procedural performance and DGJ when focus is on behavioral performance elements.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY MEDICINE , DEBRIEFING , HEALTH CARE FACILITIES , MEDICAL PERSONNEL , SIMULATION , TRAINING , TRAINING DEVICES , TRAUMA


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE